Answers coming soon! Forum closed
Tell your friends

The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

284
Ideas

9,456
Votes

494
Comments

This forum is finished. It closed about . You can still look at and comment on existing ideas!

Vote
Winning
Idea

If Australia is to use science successfully to drive forward its economy and quality of life we must, as a nation, become much more adept at the science of complex systems (e.g., the human body, the Murray Darling basin system, integrated agriculture, national water systems particularly groundwater, mineral systems and how to explore for them in the covered areas of Australia).
Unfortunately our policy settings, and therefore our funding mechanisms, do not facilitate the effective undertaking and implementation of complex-system science. Given the inherent scientific capability that exists in Australia this represents a reckless waste of potential to drive innovation across a broad spectrum of systems, innovation that would have a massive positive impact on our economy and future.
We also require a change in our cultural attitude to "applied science"; an epithet that is used in Australia to imply a lower quality of science not requiring the focus of our best scientific minds. There is no such thing as applied science, there is only science and applications of science. We need to recognise that science undertaken with the specific intent of an application (where others might make decisions worth hundreds of millions of dollars) demands the highest quality and the best minds.
The UNCOVER initiative (more information is available at http://www.uncoverminerals.org.au/ ) is tackling these issues in the specific domain of mineral exploration. The stated goal of UNCOVER is "To create the scientific knowledge and new technologies necessary to lift the success rate of mineral exploration in the covered areas of Australia to the levels enjoyed 30 years ago in the uncovered areas." The UNCOVER program recognises that this goal can only be achieved through substantial innovation carefully targeted at the real knowledge- and technical-impediments faced by Australia's minerals exploration industry. Hence UNCOVER is operating as a collaboration of 28 industry companies, 9 government agencies, 10 academic institutions, and 5 other influential organisations (e.g. the Australian Academy of Science and the Minerals Council of Australia). Yet in Australia there is no policy coverage for initiatives of this type. The PolicyHack conference represents an opportunity to redress these kinds of problems in Australia.

Vote
Winning
Idea

Let's help Australia lead the way in creating a network of affordable, sustainable housing, by funding housing co-operatives. Affordable housing is a stated aim of all of the state and territory governments, yet the Australian housing sector is in crisis. Housing is more unaffordable than ever, with workers, students and families priced out of housing. Home ownership rates and the quality of public housing have declined, while rents and housing prices have only increased.

Co-operative housing is part of the solution to the housing crisis, which will contribute to a stronger, more sustainable Australia by building citizenship simultaneously with secure, long term housing. Co-operative housing is a model in which tenants are also owners and managers of the building, and take on the responsibility of upkeep through shared labour. Co-operatives are governed by the principles of democratic member control, equality, equity, autonomy, non-discriminatory membership, respect and cooperation, education of members and concern for community. Currently Australia's successful co-operative models include state-provided public housing, and the Australian Student Housing Cooperative Organisation (ASHCO), which has member co-operatives across three states. Co-operative housing is a low-rent, high-value model, which promotes sustainability through shared resources and facilities and the enablement of high-density living. Co-operatives cost no more than private housing to build, but once built, they are economically self-sustaining, leverage autonomy and responsibility to improve cost-efficacy, and target low-income and disadvantaged populations. Australia needs a resilient, responsible, capable population, and Australia needs a sustainable solution to the housing crisis. Let's set up more co-operative housing and solve both of these problems.

Vote
Winning
Idea

China is Australia's largest trading partner, eclipsing our second and third largest trading partners, the US and Japan combined. China is rapidly shifting its global role from imitator to innovator and has filed the most domestic patent applications of any country since 2011. China is fast becoming a leading investor in innovation, with leading research universities, modern science and technology parks, and innovative start-ups. Chinese companies, which are investing more and more in R&D, are demonstrating a growing concern for IP rights. In China there are 17 million designers, 15 thousand design organisations, 50 thousand consumer products designed per year with a 10% success rate and 5 million start-ups.

It would be a grave error of the Australian innovation community to underestimate the impact of this swift rise and its scale when other nations sure aren't doing so.
The opportunity for Australia is awesome! We have a tremendous opportunity to develop the Australian innovation ecosystem by getting our engagement with China right but we currently lack the human capital in Australia with the skills, networks and confidence to work collaboratively with China. We have too few China-skilled young innovators and emerging leaders coming through the talent pipeline to fully populate this ecosystem. To develop any ecosystem, one must have a sense of the future conditions it will take place within. China will soon be the world’s largest economy and a leader in innovation and innovation investment. Any discussion of the future of Australia's innovation ecosystem, the policies which underpin it and how we develop entrepreneurs and innovators of the future must involve active mobilisation of the China opportunity.

Vote
Winning
Idea

It is apparent the current frameworks and organisation of power/ education are the causation of the many global issues we face today. Global sea levels rising, global financial crisis, global food shortages, the increasing gap between the wealthy and the poor, acidification of water, changing weather systems and an increase in natural disasters.

It is the compaction of human behaviour and thinking that has created such vast and catastrophic problems for the planet that which we depend on to survive. It seems the distribution of power in a carbon democracy, the consumer lifestyle choices we make and awareness about global issues are not enough to prepare Australia for the oncoming mass of a predicted 800 million climate change refugees in the next 200 years. Not to mention the border conflicts, power struggles between nations and changes to the human psyche that will accompany this change. Such problems demand planning, strategy, creative and lateral thinking. Where would you put say the predicted 80 million people from Bangladesh displaced by climate change in the next 50 years? In your backyard? What would you do if Australia went through one of the worst droughts imaginable creating a shortage of food ?
It is our generation that will see the biggest change in nature and humanity throughout all of our species history. The scale is unimaginable. With the possible collapse of the world economy nearing, it is of up most importance to reduce our dependence on other nations by creating a sustainable framework of living. VALUE PROPOSITION The problem is Humans are inherently unsustainable. This unsustainable thinking in consumer society is negating the future of our species. Australia is unsustainable. In order to actively address, prepare and plan for the oncoming wave of global issues Australia must: -1. Become reliant on 100 percent renewable energy ( this outcome is already possible with current technology, solar panels, wind farms, hydro electricity etc it's more the frame of mind and consumer incentive that will direct action to sustainable choices) This will involve a gradual transition from macro energy grid networks to centralised local networks or personal networks. This will also affect the design of our cities, public transport networks must be expanded using more sustainable forms of movement such as trains, zero fuel emission buses, bicycles, running. (Current technologies, town planners and sustainability consultants such as kinesis who just planned the decentralised energy master plan for the city of Sydney, already exist. Again this is a problem with the frame of mind of individuals) This will be a high cost project but the long term results will be very rewarding. Introducing nationalised Sustainable Packaging such as biodegradable coffee cups lined with seed paper are also a good idea to A.reduce waste B. Help reconstruct a more liveable environment Countries like Denmark, Iceland and Sweden are all good examples of sustainable societies. Infinite more ideas already exist, addressing and preparing for disaster involves taking initiative, being prepared for the worst outcomes, and reconstructing power models. 2. Education to prepare. Like I said addressing and preparing for these conflicts need several things creativity, lateral thinking, preparedness, planning and the ability to pre-emptively resolve conflict. In order to prepare I am not suggesting a total reconstruction of the education framework but one addition. One class that teaches thinking and not just the traditional framework of critical thinking,analysis and judgement. It could be as little as an hour long. Analysis, critical thinking and judgement are all de-constructive tools that are incapable on their own to solve problems. We need constructive tools like lateral thinking, creativity and strategy in order to have a truly intuitive, innovative, intelligent and caring society.For the world needs individuals with these qualities as does Australia in order to solve problems and resolve conflict. Subject matter that could be used in this class could be coming up with solutions to climate change, sustainability, conflict resolution and structural analysis of colonial history, capitalism, the Age of Enlightenment and western hegemony and visualising an alternative view to history and considering new patterns of thinking. A good example for a framework for this class would be Edward de bonos 'six thinking hats' which was extremely successful with its placements in schools. It is of upmost importance to teach these skills to our society we will be the ones who face the wave of oncoming global conflicts and disasters. It is particularly important because it will be the ability to think constructively that will reduce conflict, build peace and global community, become a more sustainable society and help others.

Tax reform is recommended as the key to support innovation, especially in biotechnology, which has the potential to be a major economic driver for Australia. It can deliver new technologies, high value exports, high- quality jobs and advanced manufacturing, if we can build on our established strengths for our future growth.

Government cannot directly fund to the level needed to optimise nation-building innovation impacts. Therefore, we need to look at tax reform, which stimulates innovation and enables Australia to retain what it has build and what it is yet to build, and specifically attract private capital investment. To gain the economic and social benefits, we recommend tax reform to support research-and-development-based innovation is critical in the following areas:
• Introduce a new tax benefit for qualifying ‘advanced’ manufacturers based on intellectual property, the Australian Innovation and Manufacturing Incentive (AIM Incentive). The incentive is based on the UK Patent Box but of course needs to be tailored by Parliament and industry to suit local needs. As CSL described to the Innovation Inquiry, building plant and manufacturing in Australia is less attractive than other jurisdictions. The patent box, or a version of it, is now active in 9 countries with the USA moving toward such a tax change this year. If for no other reason than competition, Australia needs to adopt something comparable. • Introduce a tax incentive to attract investor capital and to encourage long-term investments in start-ups. To attract private capital investments and support entrepreneurship, AusBiotech is advocating for a tax incentive to encourage investors to invest in young innovation-based growth companies and to ‘park’ their capital in pre-revenue, pre-dividend companies for lengthy periods. These so-called ‘patient investors’ are desirable as they provide more stability and certainty to start-up companies. • Preserve R&D Tax Incentive benefits in-tact, which is now seen by our sector as the number 1 policy issue requiring protection. The desire of government to reduce the benefit from 45% to 43.5% is not welcome and will disadvantage more keenly, small unlisted and listed companies who are not yet selling product. This is the category in greatest need of support. International competition is extreme and increasing, with serious investment occurring in many other key countries. Australia now needs to decide the importance of innovation in its economic future – its role in productivity and jobs - and make an appropriately-serious commitment to how best to drive the desired outcomes.

Dear Wyatt

I have attached a video clip and an article submitted to the Senate Inquiry into Australia's Innovation System, both of which discuss why the Government should at least consider the issue of introducing a 'patent box' style tax regime into Australia. In my view, while it is of significant importance to create an environment that encourages innovation within the Australian economy, the benefit of that effort will be eroded if innovative companies move off shore, once they have become successful. It is difficult to rationalise why the Government would spend money on encouraging businesses to be more innovative if the benefits of innovation move offshore, leaving Australia with the all the costs and none of the benefits. To match investment with reward, I believe the Government should not only look at ways to encourage more innovation within the Australian economy, it should concurrently look at how to incentivise successful businesses to stay in Australia, rather than move offshore to counties with and economy and Government policies that are supportive of commercialisation of innovative ideas.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqJb8RW1tOU http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CCkQFjACahUKEwjb_MXn-LbIAhWFKZQKHf9YAEU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aph.gov.au%2FDocumentStore.ashx%3Fid%3D6c6786fe-60da-4366-b0dd-c39a2276e238%26subId%3D298656&usg=AFQjCNFKeRDR7NzIvAmmXYyl-E7UhDAcYw&sig2=0P4Z4EUw384oqxGSAXMnmA

The future of work is changing rapidly. This is a reality that governments, industries and communities are all faced with. To support the growth of Australia's tech ecosystem and to prepare Australians for 21st century jobs, we need a new approach. In this new Digital Age, a career in tech can bring about financial security and independence, therefore reducing long-term welfare dependancy.

Traditionally, jobs in tech have required a computer science degree. This is out of reach for many disadvantaged, unemployed individuals. But many jobs within the tech ecosystem no longer require a Bachelor's degree. Therefore, we should create an intensive, technical training program which prepares unemployed and/or underemployed Australians for in-demand tech jobs. The curriculum should focus on providing participants with the top job skills most-needed, according to key tech trends. Students should also acquire key professional skills and business skills required to help them land a job upon completion.
Wage subsidies could be offered to employers who provide graduates with a job for at least 12 months. This programme could initially be trialled in a single location, and then expanded based on results. Overall, the training programme could provide valuable opportunities for groups of people who would otherwise be at risk of long-term welfare dependancy. At the same time, it could grow our ecosystem within Australia and drive innovation across various industries.

People submitting ideas
Anne-Marie Elias Kit Kriewaldt adam lyle Sallyann Williams Karen  Dado Phil McFadden Piers Warren Francis Vierboom Craig Thomler Jonathan D'Cruz Ezme Webb Brett Zimmer Matt McNamara Stuart  Wallace Sharyn Reesby Peter Batchelor Mark Pesce Clinton Mead david tuke Mark Glazebrook Zoe Rose Suzanne Nguyen Alex Buchanan Giovanni Ravone Timothy Holborn