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The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

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Governments fund science and research because it produces the technological innovations and advancements in knowledge that improve the economic productivity and living standards. However, to date we don’t understand well the outcomes of the approximately $6 billion annually in publicly funded research investment and how this research generates innovations and discoveries that benefit society. Government could benefit by measuring and mapping public research investment against indicators of economic and societal value creation to better understand the dividend to society and determine how to improve how we invest in science.

Measuring the societal and economic return of publicly funded research investment is hard. Part of the problem is the lag between research and bringing a product to market, particularly in medicine where the safety barrier is necessarily high. Another challenge is that some major discoveries are made serendipitously in a scientific field that was previously thought to be unrelated. A further problem is that time, funds, and IP to undertake commercialisation is even harder to attain than funding for the research, consequently many discoveries are commercialised much later and usually not by the discoverer.
Consequently there are not have good answers for key questions such as how much have we benefited from this investment, and what much can we expect from future investment in science and research. This makes it difficult to argue for sustaining or improving the funding to attain better outcomes in future. These questions are now not insurmountable with available data. There is a significant amount of data measuring indicators of public research funding and analysis of these metrics against public research investment is likely to yield insights into the outcomes from public research funding and potentially ways to improve funding effectiveness.

People submitting ideas
Allan Ryan Todd Hubers Raymond Xu Tom Worthington Bernard Sullivan Will Camphin Lorraine Chiroiu Warwick Peel Madel Giles Margaret OBrien Constance Titterton Jonathan D'Cruz Denis M Tom Williams Pete Ratcliffe Tim Parsons Hector Titterton Richard Ferrers Sarah Mortellaro Geoff Geary Jason Cornell david tuke Ata Mehmet Elaine Saunders Roger Lawrence