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The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

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There is a big gap between academia and the start up world. Many PhD students get access to: * academic papers * an APA scholarship that provides survival level funding * classes on how to write a good thesis * free computation access. * weekly supervision by an expert * conferences to showcase results. Students are accepted to PhD programs based on their thesis ideas and academic results. This support environment could be extended to technology entrepreneurs.

After submitting a business plan, entrepreneurs could be accepted to a government funded support program based on their plan, technology and academic qualifications. The support would offer : * relevant classes like online strategy * funding equivalent to the APA scholarship * free computation and server access
* weekly one-hour advice by a relevant qualified paid industry / government / academic expert * access to academic papers that is important for many high-tech ventures * technology exhibitions to showcase the IP and products This government funded incubator could by operated by the major Australian business schools or Universities. They would take no stake in any IP, just as with PhD students and would also provide streamlined government access like the Multimedia Super Corridor in Malaysia. They would not chose projects based on political hotness, but potential economic return. Many successful startups like Google and Facebook came from the ideas of one or two ex-students. The next generation of startups in areas like machine learning and mobile computing could be the same. Even with a handful of successful startups, the return on investment from key technology entrepreneurs may help transform the Australian economy.

Reframe your policy hack into a useful format. This means segmenting what you're trying to achieve into more focused and targeted subsets of policy rather than having a single catchall 'Australia 2020' approach. The Public Spheres run by Kate Lundy were a decent attempt at this, without having clearly defined outcomes and processes toward policy change.

The ambition of 'disrupting the public service' is effectively equivalent to a three word slogan and sets up a negative 'us vs them' tone, when the reality is that the public service is vital to implementation of the government's policy vision, and does a decent job (most times) in doing so. Yes the public service needs to modernize, much of its leadership needs renewal and most of its underlying operational procedures and technical approaches need questioning, but that should be done in a cooperative, not confrontational manner to achieve longlasting reform.
The dangers in setting up this policy hack in this manner are that a) it is difficult to achieve anything meaningful & therefore the concept of policy hacks (which are gear) is tarred by the knee-jerk approach and b) that the approach creates a poor dynamic that leads to limited success but at too great a cost. The actual policy hack approach needs to be thought out better and iterated quickly, with focus on spcific policy areas by hack and relevant groups invited to participate. This isn't about taking a ground zero approach, there's been plenty of policy hack examples from other governments where a more targeted approach has delivered real outcomes, so even in a startup sense you're trying to test things which have already been tested and verified - including in an Australian context. Don't overlook the expertise of those who have developed and executed policy hacks previously - many of thes people actually already work, or have worked, in the public service, and it seems this approach has thrown out all the competitive experience just for the reputations of Roy and Blue Chilli.

People submitting ideas
Alan Jones Saskia Kelly Geoff Geary Alex Buchanan Simon White tim wang Wayne Fitzsimmons David  Brookes Zoe Rose Jeremy Liddle Nicole Williamson D Haley Walter Villagonzalo Michelle Vanzella Jessica Menzies Glenn Gillen Roger Lawrence Dave Hall Clayton White l Paul Foxworthy Parth Gulati Sarah Mortellaro Nathan Waters Steve Zanon