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The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

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Get A Great Start.

We need to address the things that stop startups being successful in the first 2-3 years. Mostly it is around cash flow and paperwork. Entrepreneurs spend more time on paperwork and managing short term funding than they can on marketing. Any idea - not matter how good - is doomed to failure if it is not being sold. The following will be useful:
* Redeploy some ATO staff to a new Entrepreneurs Support Group, assigning relationship managers to startups. These managers can then assist startups with completing their BAS and tax returns at a reduced or no cost initially - freeing up the entrepreneur to focus on business and setting good habits for ongoing tax compliance * Commercial rental bonds just tie up huge amounts of cash (6+ months' rent) that could be freed up. Introduce a government-guaranteed rental bond scheme, where the government would guarantee an amount similar to a rental bond by charging each participant an "insurance premium". Even better, to keep costs down, outsource the set up and administration to a new startup!! * Alternatively, allow startups to keep the first $10,000 of GST as a rebate to offset the cost of admin. This would be conditional on timely lodgment and could be divided by return to ensure that one miss does not disincentivise future compliance. * Work with the banks to create a government-backed Start-Ups Loan Scheme. Normal lending criteria to apply, but the lack of capitalisation/guarantees could be replaced by a limited government guarantee. Place a cap of $250,000 per entity group (including related bodies corporate). Standard commercial rates of interest (as the Government is the borrower - that is security enough), but charge the entities the usual higher rate for riskier loans (same as they would be charged). The difference is an insurance premium for the scheme to cover the small number of irrecoverable defaults that might occur. These programmes would come essentially at the cost of administration only (with the exception of the GST/BAS initiatives, but these would be covered out by savings on undeclared obligations and "after the fact" compliance activity by the ATO.

Problem1: Skills shortage
This is a vicious circle problem:
Shortage of skilled technical personnel and no stable jobs for the available ones
Companies can’t grow because of lack of skilled technical personnel Solution: Availability of skilled technical personnel attracts multinationals and start ups and promotes growth in local companies thus creating more stable jobs Immediate solution: interested start-ups can be jointly funded by the government and interested companies (including multinationals) to provide teaching services in coding etc Long term solution: teach in schools and send students overseas on Student exchange Bring teachers from overseas on contracts / migration to fill in teacher shortage Bring skilled and experienced technical personnel from overseas on rapid migration visas for immediate employment Problem2: Seed / Angel Investment Shortage of high net-worth seed / angel investors with domain expertise (and successful exits in similar start ups); significant number of the currently available seed / angel investors are risk averse Solution: Bring high net-worth seed / angel investors with domain expertise from overseas on rapid migration visas Government can fund local consultants with domain expertise to evaluate opportunities for local investors Problem3: Less Population Insufficient population to support and participate in local market, entrepreneurship, STEM related and software programming careers Solution Increase the overall population at all levels by rapid migration Problem4: Risks for entrepreneurs It is hard for unsuccessful entrepreneurs to go back to the mainstream jobs even if they are good in their area Solution Government can provide incentives to companies for employing interested entrepreneurs and / or absorb them in schools and universities to foster entrepreneurship. This encourages people to venture into start ups Problem5: Startup incentives Insufficient incentives for start ups Solution Adopt overseas and successful models

Use lean startup methods to expose students to the process of developing their own global-focussed tech/STEM startup, and do this by embedding lean startup into upper primary and high schools using the existing curriculum of the new Economics and Business and the new Digital Technologies courses. Those students that are engaged could then extend their understanding/opportunities by involvement in national network of Startup Weekends for Youth (or similar).

As of September 2015, the new Digital Technologies subject for grades P-10 (which includes coding, computational thinking and problem solving) and the Economics and Business subject for grades 5-10 have both been endorsed for rollout Australia-wide under the Australian Curriculum starting from 2016. Leveraging this rollout to ensure all teachers of both subjects are using Lean Startup methodology, will ensure students are equipped with an understanding of what is needed to potentially develop globally-focussed startups. A significant benefit of using these courses to deliver lean startup is that ALL students will gain exposure – the Dig Tech for example is compulsory to year 8.
Without lean startup being the basis of the content, we run the risk of the new courses delivering mini-MBA style content only – i.e. the same lemonade-stand model of school businesses that has always been used. Alternatively, with lean startup being the focus of the content, students will still learn about starting their own locally-focussed small business, but also gain additional benefit from learning of lean startup principles (MVP, Customer Validation, etc). From my experience, local startup ecosystems are only too keen to be involved at every level of helping students learn more about lean startup, and would ideally be involved at every stage whether at upper primary, secondary school or at the regional events I referred to earlier.

People submitting ideas
Matt vickers David fagan Greg Mullins James Majarich Ashley Brinson pip butt Glenn Irvine John McKibbin Nicole Williamson Nicholas Howe Suzanne Nguyen Peter French Axle Max Todd Hubers Jack Taylor Madel Giles Timothy Holborn David  Brookes Karen Spiller Ivan Teong Lee Wallace Phillip Fusco Monica Wulff Tom Williams David Eccles