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The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

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Superannuation Investment in New Industries
Many have indicated that it would be advantageous if startups and companies that subsequently developed could access some the vast amount of money that is being deposited into Australia's various superannuation funds. At present most of this money is used to buy shares of existing companies both in Australia and oversees. This money enriches the share market but does not contribute substantially to national development or new jobs in Australia.
The question is, how might some of this money be used to provide investment capital invest in new, more speculative (high risk) industries or infrastructure while at the same time still fulfilling its main function of providing retirement savings?
My suggestion is that the Australian government set up dedicated funds along the lines of Singapore’s Central Provident Fund to invest in startups, new industries or even infrastructure. To make it attractive and mitigate risk for investment by Superannuation funds (commercial, industry or individual), a minimum rate of return could be guaranteed by the government creating an attractive, risk-free investment. There would be no compulsion for superannuation funds in invest in these government funds, but funds could be made to ask individual contributors whether or not they would like to invest in these funds and to what extent. I actually think that many investors would be amenable to invest part of their superannuation in such funds.

Innovation is not just science, and it’s not simply research. Australian research capability ranks highly among international peers. Across fields as diverse as robotics, biomedical engineering, materials, and high performance computing, Australia’s intellectual talent is well recognised (and frequently poached by the US and EU!) The missing link for national success is a strategy that sets aside 'market-failure' approaches and instead promotes research-industry collaboration, university technology transfer and strategic linkages to Asia. Developing novel business models and engaging unique supply chains are also part of the innovation narrative.

Informed, engaged government leadership is essential. The Australian investment environment must offer globally competitive incentives to foster innovation and retain/attract international resources.
Finally, we must equip our youngest minds with skills for the digital economy. STEM education is vital, but this is more than just science and mathematics. It is more than merely coding classes. The challenge is not necessarily boosting our science output or productivity in our largest corporations. The policy challenge is more systemic. Broad engagement across the national innovation system is needed to deliver economic growth. This demands bipartisanship and strong, independent institutions. Our proposal: build the capacity of independent institutions that work towards collaboration, technology transfer, international linkages, advice and long term community capability.

People submitting ideas
Hector Titterton Lorraine Chiroiu Stephen Baxter Madel Giles David MacSmith Brett Elliott Will Egan Justin Warren Simon White Grant Cooley Anita Spuler Tim Parsons Ryan Wardell Todd Hubers Tony Rothacker Glenn Irvine Monica Wulff Geoff Geary Clinton Mead Simon Macfarlane ulrich schild Mark Pesce Suzanne Nguyen tim wang Anthony Bishop