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The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

The Federal Government is committed to making innovation a centrepiece of the Australian economy. Policy Hack is an opportunity for industry to develop and pitch innovative solutions to some of Australia’s most pressing policy problems and help foster the growth of innovation industries in Australia.

Along with Assistant Minister for Innovation Hon. Wyatt Roy MP, BlueChilli will bring together representatives from startups, VC funds, accelerators and other components of the innovation ecosystem, with policy experts from departments of Treasury, Industry and Communications to collaborate in a one-day industry policy hackathon in Sydney, Saturday 17 October 2015.

We’ll use the hackathon methodology to nominate, select and work together in mixed teams on new government policy ideas designed to foster the growth of innovation industries including tech startups, biotech, agtech, fintech, renewables and resources.

Funding, taxation, education, migration — everything is on the table.

The champions on the highest voted policies will be invited to Sydney to lead teams on the day to workshop their ideas with government representatives.

The goal is to present a set of creative new ideas to an audience of government officials by the end of the day, to give them the top-line thinking from which full policy can be developed and implemented.

If you have a policy idea or you’d like to see and vote on which policy ideas are collaborated on at Policy Hack, you can get started right now.

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Dear Wyatt

I have attached a video clip and an article submitted to the Senate Inquiry into Australia's Innovation System, both of which discuss why the Government should at least consider the issue of introducing a 'patent box' style tax regime into Australia. In my view, while it is of significant importance to create an environment that encourages innovation within the Australian economy, the benefit of that effort will be eroded if innovative companies move off shore, once they have become successful. It is difficult to rationalise why the Government would spend money on encouraging businesses to be more innovative if the benefits of innovation move offshore, leaving Australia with the all the costs and none of the benefits. To match investment with reward, I believe the Government should not only look at ways to encourage more innovation within the Australian economy, it should concurrently look at how to incentivise successful businesses to stay in Australia, rather than move offshore to counties with and economy and Government policies that are supportive of commercialisation of innovative ideas.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqJb8RW1tOU http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CCkQFjACahUKEwjb_MXn-LbIAhWFKZQKHf9YAEU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aph.gov.au%2FDocumentStore.ashx%3Fid%3D6c6786fe-60da-4366-b0dd-c39a2276e238%26subId%3D298656&usg=AFQjCNFKeRDR7NzIvAmmXYyl-E7UhDAcYw&sig2=0P4Z4EUw384oqxGSAXMnmA

Most Seed Stage Start-up raises are under $500k.
Not the ones that will be the "next Facebook"
All the rest from major cities to regional towns.
We need to empower these brave supporters and innovators in their early days. They move forward tranche by tranche as goals are achieved until ready for a Series A. However ... the centralised regulatory and cost structure does not empower this area of funding. Including proposed Online CSEF regs. In the U.S. nearly 60 billion of funding is in this class roughly equal to 58 billion by VC, Angel and Bank finance to the same space. Lets firstly legitimise it, lower the cost and then empower it. Lets have: 1) Investment legitimisation at the "small end" that is seen as primarily funding not as an asset class play. 2) An open, shared, fully transparent, zero cost, trust based transactional recording and reporting environment where all Stakeholders including ASIC play. Why should everyone have separate ledgers for the same information and costly external trust guardians when the transaction should be the trust identifier. Goal would be that eventually this would be blockchain powered. This would remove annual cost of keeping filing info up to date with ASIC, accountants costs for duplicate share registries, real time deal reporting with continual visibility on transaction volume so abnormalities can be addressed by regulator and stakeholders, standarised templates to lower costs, transactions permanently stored with full transparent history, clear unambiguous risk warnings time stamped accepted and recorded as part of the open, shared, fully transparent, zero cost, trust based transactional recording and reporting environment. You wont need big buildings, bank vaults and floors of filing cabinets in the future to evidence a trust based funding transaction. Lets get a lead in the world and empower these brave passionate supporters and innovators now.

My idea is for government to lead the development of a social enterprise policy assisting social enterprise in Australia reach its full potential.

There is an estimated 20,000 social enterprises in Australia currently employing approx. 300,000 Australians and contributing between 2-3% GDP. However, in Australia there is no government policy or leadership for the growth of social enterprise, making access to business skills and training, investment capital and new markets an ongoing challenge.
As an international comparison, through successive government leadership, the UK has approx. 80,000 social enterprises, contributing to approx. 5-6% of GDP employing over 1 million people. In the US, government has legislated all federal departments to determine if their contract needs can be met by social enterprise. This has resulted in social enterprises securing $2 billion per annum from government contracts creating jobs for 50,000 people with disability. As a viable business model, social enterprises are businesses that exist with the intention and commitment to create positive social impact while using the marketplace to trade and generate revenue. Social enterprise has the ability to strengthen Australian communities by generating employment, income and increasing access to services. Because the sector is already in existence, social enterprise could potentially employ over 500,000 Australians and generate up to 5% of GDP in a very short period of time with the right policy and leadership from the Australian Federal government in creating the necessary ecosystem for this business model to flourish.

Australians need to be safe online when using Government services.

The worlds strongest security is also the worlds fastest and easiest, and is built right here in QLD, Australia, by us - CryptoPhoto.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Right now, Government is using either Auskey (which no longer works on either Chrome or Windows), at a cost of $60M/year, or is sending SMS messages ($unknown, probably $millions as well), despite the fact that every Telco in Australia has warned, repeatedly that SMS should *never* be used for security, because it is not safe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adopting CryptoPhoto into our government is the perfect chance to do all of the following: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. Keep Australians safe! CryptoPhoto blocks phishing and malware (which cause 90% of all problems - read the latest ASD advice - phishing is the #1 threat!) - no other security systems offer this protection right now. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Show an Australian company that the government is serious about innovation. Handouts and grants are nice, but EVERYONE in start-up world knows that TRACTION is more valuable than anything else. Put a commitment where you mouth is: adopt the best tech there is, which is made right here, at the same time as catapulting the value of a local company into the hundreds-of-millions ballpark! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Save tens of millions of dollars. The $60M Auskey expense can be at least cut in half. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Make online services easier. Only half of us ever adopted Auskey, and putting it bluntly, it's horrible. It never worked on mobile (hello - 70% of us access online *only* by mobile now!), and now it doesn’t work on Windows or Chrome either. CryptoPhoto can make public use of government services EASY and FAST as well as the SAFEST possible in the world. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. CryptoPhoto is committed to worldwide expansion, but STAYING HERE. Help us draw back all the talent we've lost to overseas by giving us the leg-up we need to hire more staff and expand faster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * You - reader - please upvote this suggestion! Lets get another huge Aussie success story into the world - your upvote will count! * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (sorry about the dots - this web site has no formatting...)

Let's encourage and enable students to take a gap year in order to launch a startup. This would spark the launch of 1000s of new startups each year, creating a massive entrepreneurial culture. The National Enterprise Initiative Scheme (NEIS) already provides ~$12k over the course of a year to help start a business. You first need to qualify for NewStart, and they require an 8-week Business Cert IV course which results in one of those outdated 100-page business plans. Most NEIS businesses are small, local, non-scalable, non-tech startups.

As a student in a sharehouse, $12k is just enough to live off (particularly outside Sydney). Though if we reconfigure NEIS and combine it with something like Bill Shorten's "Startup Year" HECS-funded idea, we could bump that to ~$30k and enable any student regardless of NewStart eligibility to "take a gap year and launch a startup". Replace the Business Cert IV with a lean startup bootcamp and lean canvas business plan, and encourage students to launch global, scalable technology startups. Provide all students with free coworking space either at their local university or one nearby (if exists). Provide mentorship and super close ties to their local startup scene (eg free hotdesking at nearby incubators and coworking spaces).
For many students this will be their first startup, and so it's expected that most will fail. But that's completely ok. The initiative will have spread the entrepreneurial bug across 1000s of young Australians. Students will find it much easier to get a job with "launched a startup" on their resume, and they will inevitably be itching to launch their next startup in the future. The whole initiative could be started now with no additional funding required. Full breakdown here: https://www.facebook.com/notes/gongstartups/how-to-launch-1000-new-startups-per-year-in-australia-with-no-additional-funding/841940902549264

People submitting ideas
MIchael McCann Todd Hubers Patrick Mooney Alex Buchanan Simon Gemmell Sebastien Eckersley-Maslin Phillip Fusco Annie Beaulieu Allan Ryan Johan Karlsson Andrew Bills Adam Mostogl Frank  Jensen Peter Boyce Rayn Ong Madel Giles Lachlan Blackhall Anthony Bishop David Rigby adam lyle Clinton Mead Anita Spuler Glenn Gillen Mark Pesce Andrew Macpherson